Jekyll Island Beach 2012

Jekyll Island Beach 2012
There was an error in this gadget

Wednesday, May 4, 2011

CASSANDRA


The Rogue Speaks:

In Homer's Iliad, Cassandra was the daughter of Priam, the king of Troy, in the time of the Trojan War. One day, Cassandra fell asleep in the temple of Apollo. Apollo saw her and, because she was stunningly beautiful, he started thinking with his other "brain." When she awoke, he promised to teach her the art of prophecy if she will have sex with him. Cassandra thought it would be really cool to be a prophetess, so she agreed. Apollo then gave her that gift, and expected his gift from her in return. I suppose she was have second thoughts about losing her virginity even to a god, so she welshed on the deal. Apollo became outraged. He told her that he would let her keep that gift, but no one would ever believe anything she said.



Painting of Apollo and the Nine Muses



Poor Cassandra! She was ignored, even though she spoke the truth! People thought she was a raving lunatic. She predicted that the Trojan horse, supposedly a gift, would house warriors, and was really a military trick. Her own father didn't believe her, and neither did her brother Paris. You remember Paris, who was in love with Helen of Troy. Those two actually started the Trojan war! Helen had been promised to Menelaus of Sparta, so when Paris took her and would not give her back, the Trojan war, predicted by Cassandra, began.


Painting of Paris and Helen

When Troy fell, Casandra escaped into the temple of Athena. The god Ajax found her there and violently abducted her and took her virginity. Then he dragged her off to king Agamemnon to be the king's sex slave. Later, both Agamemnon and Cassandra were murdered by the king's wife and her lover.

In Greek mythology, mortals were regularly cursed for not cooperating. The gods required mere men to keep their godly laws, and if they did not, they were severely punished. Greek gods are notoriously childish and immature, so it is not at all surprising that Apollo cursed Cassandra. Some think that Cassandra got what she deserved for manipulating Apollo into giving her such a gift.

I thought long and hard to find an interesting "C" for Jenny's Alphabe-Thursday. I hope you enjoyed my offering. I know I will enjoy reading yours.

34 comments:

Personalized Sketches and Sentiments said...

Lovely paintings of these mythical tales. I would love to be as talented in painting such imagery!

Blessings & Aloha!

Jo said...

That was very very interesting ... and enjoyable Judie! thanks for spending time thinking of a such a fascinating topic!

nothingprofound said...

"Thinking with his other brain"-I wonder how many tragedies that's caused! Those Greeks certainly didn't paint a very pretty picture of life. Great storytellers, but a gruesome lot.

EG Wow said...

Hmmmm. I guess its best not to trick Apollo! I would have thought knowing what's going to happen and then having everyone ignore you when you try to warn them would be enough of a punishment. Just saying!

dlmsliceofpie said...

Love it! Thanks for sharing.

JDaniel4's Mom said...

They really should have listened to her.

☆☆Mumsy said...

This is indeed an interesting post, and I've learned something new today! Fascinating as always, Judie!

myorii said...

Definitely an interesting "C" post! Greek mythology is always so strange. Is it me or is a lot of it driven by sex, lust and sometimes love? Most wars and disagreements seem to stem from someone sleeping/stealing/ravishing someone else's spouse/child/sibling/lover. These Greek mythologies are like soup operas of the past!

Jo said...

Hey Judie,now that was so interesting,you educate!
Lovin' "C"asandra's story!
Great "C".
And thank you so much for visiting me again at LazyonLoblolly, your visit and your comments are appreciated so much.
Happy Mothers Day!
~Jo
LazyonLoblolly

Karen S. said...

Oh I love your informative posts, and such awesome photos you bring forth as well. Cassandra is my daughter-in-law's name, so I have a fondness for this Cassandra! Great C post Judie! Thanks so much!

Jenny said...

Holy Alphabet coolness!

Wow, Miss Judy. This was a fascinating post. I used to be intriqued with mythology but my parents thought it was anti-religious and banned it in our house. Don't ask...sigh...

But I would still sneak and read my copy of the Iliad and the Odyssey under my covers with a flashlight.

I'm going to dig through my bookshelves and find my copy. I would like to start reading some of these tales again.

This was really amazing.

I love the way you write.

Thanks for linking.

A+

Life in Rehab said...

My children devour mythology and art like it's ice cream, so I'll be forwarding this post to them to turn it into a dinner topic. VERY nicely done.

Bianca said...

What a cool post! Thanks for sharing. :)

the 'Trees said...

Hmmm...I should go see what my daughter has on her bookshelf! There may be some interesting reading in there. I'd never even heard of Cassandra - Thanks for this post!

Pat @ Mille Fiori Favoriti said...

I enjoyed reading the story of poor Cassandra, Judie! I don't know enough about Mythology beyond a few of the stories about the major gods that I remember from reading in literature. It's alway nice to learn something new!

Theresa said...

ALWAYS enjoy your posts Judie! Isn't it cool to know you are inspiring?

askcherlock said...

Truly insightful, Judie. I always learn an inside scoop when you do these. It's true. You are inspiring. :) The paintings you used in this are just beautiful!

Jingle said...

fantastic story,

she is cool,
blessings.
Happy Weekend,
Happy Mother's Day.

Jingle said...

Thanks for the comments in my place.
you rock.

Ames said...

I was never one for mythology but you made it all so interesting! Great "C" post Judie! ~Ames

JJ said...

I enjoyed it very much!

Akseli Koskela said...

Isn't it amazing what a formative influence Greek tragedy has had on Western Literature and culture. A very informative read Judie.

RNSANE said...

What an outstanding "C" presentation. Poor foolish Cassandra. She certainly came to a sad finale. I do so love Greek and Roman mythology, having spent time in both Rome and Greece. They do love their gods!!

Su-sieee! Mac said...

Golly! The World Book Encyclopedia's version sure left a lot out!

storybeader said...

I've always loved mythology - Greek was my choice in college between that and Roman! Thanks for the reminder - maybe I can get my woman's book club to read some! {:-Deb

Amiko said...

I really enjoy reading it... because I never knew about Cassandra, but I know Helen of Troy...^^

Thank you for posting it Judie...

Happy Mother Day!

Mari's World said...

I loved that. Cassandra trying to be clever and becoming undone by her own making.
Thank Heavens it was only Greek myth!

Tammy said...

Wow. "C" is also for "clever!"

Cindy Adkins said...

Wow! "C" is for "Completely Interesting!" Have a wonderful weekend!!!
XO
Cindy

Lola said...

Hi again!

Apologies. Bit late again this week - been so busy lately!

Thank you so much for stopping by and look forward to *seeing* you again soon.

Hope you have a good weekend,

XOXO Lola )

Francisca said...

A Clever C post, Judie! Too bad Cassandra was Comely, but not so Clever herself.

Gattina said...

Geez I forgot that Homer was worse than Stephen King !

ChrisJ said...

You're so right; the Greek gods were childish in the extreme, but interesting for all that. Good post - as always.

Cheryl D. said...

I totally flaked this week on reading the "C" posts! I just remembered today! Anyway, I really enjoyed reading about Cassandra. I didn't know anything about her!